Cranberry Fritillary

Boloria aquilonaris


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Boloria aquilonaris

Male, Switzerland, June 2015

Boloria aquilonaris

Male, Switzerland, June 2015

Boloria aquilonaris

Male, Switzerland, June 2015

Cranberry fritillary - Boloria aquilonaris

Male, Switzerland, July 2013

Cranberry fritillary - Boloria aquilonaris

Male, Switzerland, July 2011

Cranberry fritillary - Boloria aquilonaris

Female, July 2011

Cranberry fritillary - Boloria aquilonaris

Roosting, Swtizerland, July 2011

Cranberry fritillary - Boloria aquilonaris

Female, Switzerland, July 2013, on the foodplant

Cranberry fritillary - Boloria aquilonaris

Male, Switzerland, July 2011


Female, Switzerland, July 2009



Female, Switzerland, July 2009



Male, Switzerland, July 2009



Female, Switzerland, July 2009



Male, Switzerland, July 2009



Male, Switzerland, July 2009



Female, Switzerland, July 2009



Female, Switzerland, July 2009

Boloria aquilonaris egg - cranberry fritillary

Egg - laid on a plant near the foodplant

This delightful fritillary flies in wet, typically upland areas with Vacciniinum plants, usually in the vicinity of trees, and may be locally abundant even though more globally it is a scarce butterfly. I have only seen it at one extended site in Switzerland, within which there were at least two more or less discrete local colonies. There, the butterflies were really very characteristic - noticeably smaller than their congeners, forever buzzing around over the Vacciniinum foodplant, never gliding, rarely settling and then briefly. I am told they are not always so small. The specific thing to look for is the prominence, almost branding, of the black markings on the underside of the forewings - visible in some of the pictures above. These markings are much less distinct in mountain fritillary and shepherd's fritillary. The upperside markings are also more thick and less obviously linear than in those two species.

The site where I see these butterflies was very close to human activity and like all wetland butterflies it and its habitat need protection if it is to survive indefinitely in its fragmented populations.